Helping patients and
physicians manage
COVID-19 + Influenza A & B

Now, get COVID-19 and Influenza A & B virus testing with one swab.

  • In addition to our COVID-19 virus and antibody testing, we now offer Influenza A & B virus testing either as a standalone RT-PCR test or as a combination panel with COVID-19 virus test (one swab)

  • KSL offers quality laboratory diagnostics for patient screening and management

  • Testing of swabs for virus and blood for antibodies

See below for more information on KSL Diagnostics' new Influenza A & B + COVID-19 Virus Testing by RT-PCR.

Test Menu:

NEW — Influenza A & B + COVID-19 Virus Testing by RT-PCR

Influenza (flu) is an acute respiratory illness caused by infection with the influenza virus. Influenza viruses consist of three types: Influenza A, Influenza B, and Influenza C. In the U.S., Influenza A/H1N1, A/H3N2 and Influenza B are the predominant seasonal viruses. Influenza A and B viruses are among the leading causes of respiratory infections, estimated to affect 5-10% of adults and 20-30% of children every year worldwide. Influenza is primarily spread by breathing in infected droplets formed when a person with the flu sneezes, coughs, or talks. Symptoms include fever, cough, headache, fatigue, muscle pain, sore throat, and runny nose. Elderly people, young children and people with weakened immune systems or chronic medical conditions can be at high risk for serious disease. Each year, approximately 3 to 5 million people develop severe illness and 290,000 to 650,000 people die from the flu. (WHO, 2020).

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that can cause illness in animals or humans. In humans there are several known coronaviruses that cause respiratory infections. These coronaviruses range from the common cold to more severe diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and COVID-19. COVID-19 was identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019. COVID-19 is caused by the virus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a new virus in humans causing respiratory illness which can be spread from person-to-person. COVID-19 is primarily transmitted from person-to-person through respiratory droplets (CDC, 2019).

 

Influenza and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis. (CDC, 2020)

While SARS-CoV-2 and influenza infections can present with similar symptoms, the treatment directions are likely to be different. Knowing what infection, a patient has will allow the clinician to optimally guide triage and treatment decision and bring confidence to patients. It also will help public health officials the information they need to better control the spread of COVID-19 and influenza, which share similar symptoms, during the Fall 2020 flu season.

The Influenza A & B/SARS-CoV-2 combination multiplex assay is a real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test that detects and differentiates RNA from SARS-CoV-2, influenza A virus, and influenza B virus in upper or lower respiratory specimens. Nasal or nasopharyngeal swab samples are collected from individuals suspected of a respiratory viral infection. The assay provides a sensitive, nucleic-acid-based diagnostic tool for evaluation of specimens from patients in the acute phase of infection.

References:

 

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1.8OO.96O.1O8O

1OOO Youngs Road  |  Suite 21O
Buffalo NY 14221 USA
716.431.5757 Corporate Fax
info@ksldx.com
Looking for KSL Biomedical? Click HERE.

Prescription Fax Numbers

Williamsville – Youngs Road

(716) 559-1582

 

Downtown Buffalo – Best Street

(716) 800-6057

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